New hope for Hahn, Weeze and Tegel

Ryanair has reached an agreement with the pilots union on wage cuts. This increases the chances that the Irish company’s aircraft will continue to head for the three German locations.

A Boeing 737-800 operated by the Irish low-cost airline Ryanair stands on the apron at Hahn Airport.

Dhe low-cost airline Ryanair and its German pilots have largely agreed on the wage cuts demanded by the company. This was confirmed on Tuesday by the company in Dublin and the pilots’ union Vereinigung Cockpit in Frankfurt. This increases the chances that the Irish airline’s aircraft will remain stationed at Hahn, Weeze and Berlin-Tegel over the winter.

After a tight ballot against the Ryanair proposals, the situation was reassessed, said VC spokesman Janis Schmitt. In renewed negotiations over the weekend, improvements in protection against dismissal were achieved. In addition, pilots must now be offered a relocation if their station is closed.

Ryanair boss Michael O’Leary had stated that 85 percent of the pilots and 75 percent of the flight attendants had agreed to the temporary cuts. This was denied by both the VC and the Verdi union, which is responsible for cabin crew. Negotiations for the flight attendants will be continued this week, said a Verdi spokeswoman. There is still no degree.

Ryanair had threatened internally with the closure of German bases of its subsidiary Malta Air if there was no approval. The airline now wants to rethink the station closings, which would affect around 170 pilots and 350 flight attendants. The group had also reported excess staff at other German bases.

Like many other airlines, Ryanair has suffered badly from the Corona crisis. In June, the company recorded a 97 percent drop in passenger numbers compared to the same period in the previous year. With many states easing their travel restrictions, the situation eased somewhat in July. Many Ryanair planes are back in the skies over Europe: The airline is currently advertising massively with particularly cheap offers in the battle for passengers.